The Blurb

It’s not jumping the gun if I have ‘mostly’ finished the epilogue. In my opinion, the blurb is one of the most important parts of the marketing process and how one pitches one’s work.

What do you think of my blurb below? Would it hook you? Bear in mind that these are still the early days and the content is likely to change. Nevertheless, unlike the free stock image of this post (from pexels) my work is still copyrighted.

“That is one thing that they never tell you in the great sagas, indeed the great poets always omitted that, even Homer. Oh yes, I remember how he tells of Achilles and his dragging the corpse of the slain Hector around the walls of Ilium, and his depictions of battle were quite vivid. But not even the boasting Roman soldier on leave tells you about how they lie there when it is over, even when he is most thoroughly drunk…”

When Gaius Veturius Drusus hears the hooves of the messenger approach his estate, he knows instinctively that it brings bad tidings. Perhaps it was something about the way the sound of the galloping hooves stirred within him memories which he had hoped to bury, or the sweating and panting of both horse and rider as they approached him with the message.

Having retired comfortably in Roman Britain as a discharged veteran and having exercised his right to marry the first non-Roman citizen upon discharge, Drusus has settled into a quiet life on his estate with his long-time lover and now wife, Brigid of the Dobunni. He has formally adopted their daughters into his new household and has begun to earn the respect of the people who look up to him for leadership, both Roman and Briton alike.

Now, with the razing of the provincial capital, Camulodunum and the Governor of Roman Britain ordering all available veterans to return to service with the utmost urgency, Drusus must put aside his aspirations to raise a household and take up arms again.

The uncertainty of his future and the acts of savagery committed by both occupiers and rebels during the uprising are disturbing and unmerciful, and one thing is for certain: life will never be the same for him, his colleagues and his family ever again.

Janus was a two-faced god, a deity who represented many aspects of life including duality. Having two faces allowed him to look at the past, and face the future. Gaius Veturius Drusus is both a soldier and a loving father – a man who lives by the sword as well as his convictions, a man who has to face the atrocities of war, and come to terms with the battle he fights within: how to live with one face instead of two.

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